How to buy property in Manhattan, New York

Posted by Wei Min Tan on July 20, 2021

How to buy property in Manhattan, New York in 5 easy steps.  It starts with engaging a buyer’s broker, then identifying the right buy, negotiating the deal and contract signing, preparing for closing, and finally closing.

 

 

Contact:  tan@castle-avenue.com

Read about Wei Min’s style in Best Manhattan property agents and Role of a buyer’s broker

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Step 1:  Engaging a buyer’s broker

In New York, there are usually two brokers to a transaction.  The seller’s broker and the buyer’s broker.  The seller’s broker is the one who lists the property for sale and has his/her photo beside the listing you may view on websites like streeteasy.com, zillow.com etc.  His role is to maximize price for the seller by getting the most traffic to view the property and generating the most interest from the public.

 

The buyer’s broker is the one who represents the interest of the buyer.  You won’t see his photo anywhere.  He is the one who explains the upsides and downsides of each property, why something is a good buy and another is not.  I am usually the buyer’s broker.

 

The best way to select a buyer’s broker is to interview a few and see who is the best fit.  Having a buyer’s broker is crucial as he’s your objective advisor.  Who else is going to tell you the downsides of a property?

 

Weimin’s article, New York property trends

 

 

Deal example:  Client’s condo in Midtown East.  Booked at pre-construction stage, waited 2 years for completion after which it was always rented.  Close to United Nations, Citigroup Center. 

 

 

Step 2:  Identify the right buy

Having identified your buyer’s broker, you are ready to shop for properties.   You and your buyer’s broker would identify metrics upon which you’d evaluate the properties, view the properties and ultimately shortlist the finalists based on your objectives.  For example, buying a vacation apartment facing Central Park has very different criteria than buying an investment apartment in Manhattan to rent out.

 

The buyer’s broker should know the entire market so he can recommend the right buildings based on your objectives.  For example, if you want an apartment with a terrace, the buyer’s broker should know the difference between the types of outdoor spaces in Manhattan.

 

Weimin’s article, Buying and then reselling a Manhattan Art Deco prewar condo with a 500 sqft terrace

 

 

Step 3:  Negotiating the deal and contract signing

Your buyer’s broker would evaluate what to offer based on closed comparable properties.  An offer is presented and seller typically provides a counter offer.  This may go on a few rounds.  When both parties finally agree on price and terms, there is an accepted offer.  Having an accepted offer is still not binding.  The seller’s broker then prepares a deal sheet and the seller’s lawyer drafts the sale contract and sends to buyer’s lawyer.

 

The lawyers review, negotiate legal fine points and when the contract is finalized, the buyer signs and provides the contract deposit.  Then it gets delivered to seller to countersign.  It is at this point that both parties are bound by the contract.

 

 

Step 4:  Preparing for closing

This step involves submitting a formal mortgage application to the buyer’s bank to initiate the mortgage process.  The bank appraises the property and the underwriter performs the necessary bank steps to eventually issue a mortgage commitment letter.  With a cash purchase, this step is avoided since there is no mortgage.

 

Concurrently, the buyer’s broker and buyer prepare and submit the board package.  With a condo, this step is highly administrative but a rubber stamp process.  Condos always approve the transaction because rejecting means the condo board has to buy up the property from the seller with the same terms.  But with a Coop, it’s very different.  A Coop board can reject a transaction without consequence.   Anyway, after the board package is submitted, all parties wait for board approval.

 

 

Deal example:  Client’s waterview apartment with terrace in Financial District.  High ceilings, prewar condo, dual exposures to south and west.  FiDi is a value buy with upside potential driven by WTC.

 

Step 5:  Closing

After the bank provides a clear-to-close and the board has approved, all parties will agree on a day of closing.  Closing is usually about 60 days from when the contract was signed, if there is a mortgage involved.  If no mortgage, then closing can be in 30 days.  Closing is the point after which the buyer becomes the official owner of the property.

 

The above is the process for a resale transaction.  With a new development, closing is usually 1-2 years from when the contract was first signed because the buyer needs to wait for completion of the property project.

 

Weimin’s article, Buying new vs resale condo in Manhattan

 

 

What We Do

We focus on global investors buying Manhattan condos for portfolio diversification and long term return-on-investment.
1) Identify the right buy based on objectives
2) Manage the buy process
3) Rent out the property
4) Manage tenants
5) Market the property at the eventual sale

 

 

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About Wei Min

  • Focuses on investors of Manhattan condominiums, interviewed by CNBC, CNN, Wall Street Journal, New York Times
  • Ex-Citibanker, managed $500 million portfolio
  • MBA, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Manhattan resident since 1999. Currently lives in Tribeca with wife and 2 kids
  • 352 burpees in 23 minutes, student of muay thai kickboxing

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About Wei Min


  • Focuses on investors of Manhattan condominiums, interviewed by CNBC, CNN, Wall Street Journal, New York Times
  • Ex-Citibanker, managed $500 million portfolio
  • MBA, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Manhattan resident since 1999. Currently lives in Tribeca with wife and 2 kids
  • 352 burpees in 23 minutes, student of muay thai kickboxing

Work With Wei Min

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